FTC Guidelines – DOs and DON`Ts in Influencer Marketing

FTC-Guideline-–-DOs-and-DON`Ts-in-influencer-marketing

FTC Guidelines – DOs and DON`Ts in Influencer Marketing

FTC Guidelines that will make you do influencer marketing the right way

FTC Guidelines for influencer marketing rests on the assumption that consumers are more likely to have a different reaction to recommendations that come from their trusted beliefs, than from people of whom receive compensation to endorse a product. In the light of this, FTC strives to build more transparency by putting more obligation on brands, inclusive of influencers as well, to openly disclose the relationship between the companies and the influencers (digital star), of whom to applaud their products or services. With that said, here are some FTC Guidelines that will make you and influencers do influencer marketing the right way.

 

Disclosure guidelines by platform

FTC-guidelines-youtube
 
 
 
 

YouTube

DOs

• Disclosure must be verbal, but can also include written guidelines
• Words or Phrases used, should be forthcoming and definite, such as “Sponsored Advertising Content,” “Sponsored by,” or “Paid Advertisement.”
• Sponsorship information should be before the “Show More” section in the Description button
• Disclosure should be done in the beginning part of the video
• For Written Disclosures, the Disclosure must persist long enough for it to be read and understood

DON’Ts

• Avoid the use of ambiguous phrases like “Thanks to..,” for Disclosures should be clear and straightforward
• Don’t Hide Written Disclosure to the bottom most part or at the very end of the video description
• Written disclosures shouldn’t be made too brief to be read or the same color as the background
• In the Video, Don’t fail to include written, as well as, the verbal disclosure
FTC-guidelines-Instagram
 
 
 
 

Instagram

DOs

• Disclosure on Sponsorship should be placed at the opening section of the description and before the “more” button
• When Disclosing partnership, Use the Hashtag #sponsored, #paid, or #ad
• Tag the Sponsoring Brand in post description, Use the Phrase “Sponsored by…”

DON’Ts

• Don’t Put Disclosure at the very end of the post description
• Disclosure should not be among many other Hashtags, (Don’t Bury the Disclosure in Hashtags)
• The use of hashtags such as #sp, #spon, should be avoided for they don’t convey ownership
• Don’t use ambiguous phrases such as “Partnering with…” or “Collaborating with…” Additionally, the disclosure should not be placed in the comment but rather in post description.
ftc-guidelines-snapchat
 
 
 
 

Snapchat

DOs

• Disclosure should be in First Snap of a Story
• On the sponsored Snap Write #ad, #sponsored, or #paid, similarly if content is a video, verbally disclose the sponsorship

DON’Ts

• Disclosure should not be at the end of a Snapchat Story
• Avoid the use of ambiguous hashtags, such as #sp, #spon that do not clearly communicate the sponsorship
• If sponsored content is a video don’t Fail to disclose sponsorship verbally
ftc-guidelines-blog
 
 
 
 

Blogs

DOs

• Disclosure should be in an easy-to-read font
• Phrase such as “This post is sponsored by…” should be used to communicate the sponsorship
• Place disclosure at the opening section of a sponsored blog post

DON’Ts

• Don’t use unclear or ambiguous terms such as “Collaboration with…” or “Thanks to my friends at…”
• Sponsorship disclosure should not be at the end of a blog post
ftc-guidelines-facebook
 
 
 
 

Facebook

DOs

• Disclosure should be placed in the inaugural section of the post’s description
• If using hashtags avoid ambiguous hashtags, use #sponsored, #ad or #paid,
• If sponsored Facebook content is in video format, disclose sponsorship in writing or verbally.
• Tag the sponsoring brand

DON’Ts

• Don’t Use unclear or ambiguous phrases or hashtags, such as #sp, #spon, “Thanks to…”, as well as #collaboration or “Video made possible by…
• If sponsored content is a video, don’t Fail to include sponsorship within the video itself

 

Facebook Live

DOs

• Disclose sponsorship verbally at the beginning of the video
• The disclosure should be in the video description section in straightforward and unambiguous terms
• Use #ad or #sponsored in the video description (if using hashtags).

DON’Ts

• Fail to disclose sponsorship within the video itself
• Fail to clearly disclose sponsorship in the video description
• Use ambiguous words or phrases such as #sp, #spon, “Thanks to…” or “Video made possible by….”
ftc-guidelines-twitter
 
 
 
 

Twitter

DOs

• In sponsored tweets Include #ad or #paid at the first sections of the tweet
• Tag the sponsoring brand when applicable

DON’Ts

• Don’t Use ambiguous or unclear hashtags like #spon, #sp, #collaboration
• Disclosure should not be at the end of the sponsored tweet

 

Disclosure language

 

Hashtags

DOs

• Use hashtag that explicitly and unambiguously conveys sponsorship, such as #sponsored, #ad and #paid
• Put disclosure hashtags at the inaugural section of the blog post

DON’Ts

• Avoid the use of hashtags that don’t convey nature of the sponsored content, such as #partner #spon, as well as, #sp, or any other

 

Verbal

DOs

• Use phrases that convey sponsorship, Examples include, “This post is sponsored by…” or other similar ones
• Disclosure should be at the introductory section of video, podcast or other sponsored content

DON’Ts

• Don’t use phrases that are ambiguous or do not denote the relationship between the two. That is the brand and the social influencer. A good example being “Thanks to…” or other similar phrases

 

Written

DOs

• Write “This post is sponsored by…” in explicit, visible words, and that is a different color than the background color
• Written disclosures should occur at the opening section of sponsored social media content
• For videos, written disclosures must remain on display for a long enough period for clear reading and further understanding.

DON’Ts

• Avoid the use of unclear phrases in written phrases. Examples in this category include, “Made possible by…” as well as, “Thanks to…”
• Make disclosures difficult to read or understand
• For videos, include written disclosures that are too brief to be read and/or understood

 

Links

DOs

• Include links to sponsored content that is properly disclosed

DON’Ts

• Include links to sponsoring brand`s website with unclear or no indication of sponsorship

 

Language

DOs

• “Sponsored by…”
• “Paid for by….”
• “This product was given to me by….”

DON`Ts

• “In partnership with”
• “Thanks to…”
• “In collaboration with”
• “This brand rocks!”

 

The appearance of the FTC Guidelines is the logical progression on the way to professional and scalable influencer marketing which is also supported by Reachbird. Furthermore, the FTC Guidelines are the first guiding principles both for influencers as well as for advertisers.

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